Quality Teaching in Practice Conference

8am – 8.25am Registration tea and coffee

8.30am – 8.45am Welcome to Country and Opening Remarks

8.45am – 9.45am Keynote Jenny Gore – Rethinking pedagogy: the central plank in school improvement

9.50am – 10.15am School presentations

10.20am – 10.45am School presentations

Morning Tea

11.15am – 11.40am Research presentations

11.45am – 12.45pm Keynote Nicole Mockler – From ‘National Values’ to ‘Teacher Quality’: Representations of Teachers in the Australian Print Media 1996 to 2020

Lunch

Session 1 presentation abstracts

Gallery 1
9:50 AM
VICKY
WHITEHEAD &
PETER JONES
Longneck Lagoon
& Wetlands EEC
Quality Teaching in the Environmental Education Centre context

What is quality teaching in an Environmental Education Centre? This presentation will explore how we made the QT Model work for us in a ‘mixed mode’ – lesson observations and evaluation of learning tasks using the Assessment Practice Guide.

10:20 AM
DENISE SMOOTHER
Sandon Public School
Embedding Quality Teaching Rounds at Sandon Public School

Our story is a journey of discovery, of how QTR grew from the involvement of two staff in a research project to having QTR become the driver of our Strategic Direction, Excellence in Teaching. QTR is embedded in our Strategic Improvement Plan 2021 – 2024. This presentation is our story of how we involve staff and provide resources and structures to allow QTR to drive teacher collaboration and efficacy.

11:15 AM
LEANNE FRAY
University of
Newcastle
Quality Teaching in Schools for Specific Purposes

Schools for Specific Purposes (SSPs) provide an intensive level of support for students in specialised education settings and the process of school improvement can be complex. In this presentation, we report on school improvement efforts in such a school setting, supported by QTR. Kotara School is comprised of four primary classes (up to seven students per class) and two classes at the nearby Nexus ward at John Hunter Hospital. Drawing on data from classroom observations and interviews with school leaders and teachers, we demonstrate how participation in QTR improved teaching quality and had significant positive impacts on school culture.

 

Gallery 2
9:50 AM
NICOLE BALL & BRIONY SCANLON
Parramatta Public School
The Parramatta Public School Quality Teaching Rounds journey

This presentation will focus on Parramatta Public School’s journey from peer observations with school developed observation templates, through to training all 95 teaching staff in the school on the QT Model and QTR processes. We will outline the challenges faced and how our school embeded this approach into our teaching practice. We will discuss how our commitment to teacher observation and collegial discourse enabled improved teaching practice and strengthened our school community as a whole.

10:20 AM
AMY GRACE & KIM SMITH
Oxley Park Public School
Oxley Park’s 10 year journey of Quality Teaching Rounds

Oxley Park Public School has been involved in QTR since 2013. Over this time, we have built collegial trust among diverse groups of teachers, ensured the process is manageable and sustainable, and kept things ‘fresh’ by incorporating the needs of our school and context. Through our well established QTR program, we have been able to reflect on quality teaching elements in our everyday lessons and use the feedback from our discussions to plan for future programs collaboratively. We have created an environment which fosters high expectations for our students and staff through our needs-based approach to QTR.

11:15 AM
JENNY GORE
University of Newcastle
Dispelling myths and embracing evidence for school improvement through Quality Teaching Rounds

This presentation addresses six myths getting in the way of widescale school improvement and outlines how QTR offers a powerful alternative. The myths I tackle are: professional development makes a difference; professional development empowers teachers; disadvantaged schools deliver poorer quality teaching; experience guarantees better quality teaching; schools have the answers; and evidence can be trusted. In so doing, I discuss how QTR can support school leaders, across multiple dimensions of their practice, to deliver school improvement.

 

Gallery 3
9:50 AM
MICHELLE WARE
QT Academy
Enhancing the quality of assessment activities, programs and remote learning materials through the lens of the QT Model.

This presentation draws attention to how the QT Model can be used as a lens for teachers to analyse and enhance their assessment activities, learning materials and units of work. Learning-from-home has significantly disrupted plans to implement QTR. However, teachers can still engage with the QT Model beyond QTR processes. The Assessment Practice Guide supports teachers to enhance the quality of tasks and assessment materials, and is equally applicable to learning materials sent home during remote learning. This presentation also addresses how the Model can strengthen the quality of program design

10:20 AM
DAVID SHAW, ADRIAN KUSWENDI, DINA VADINOS & HEATHER LINGARD
Hambledon Public School
Quality Teaching Rounds makes a difference

Hambledon Public School is committed to ensuring all its teachers take part in QTR. The school-wide impact of QTR and the QTR Model is evident in a strong school culture. Passionate, collaborative, and innovative teachers, and our flexible teaching team, will ensure all 45 teachers participate in QTR in four years using a “rippling effect”, in which those initially trained go on to train others. Classroom teachers are now driving their own professional learning communities and in charge of draughting their own teams, with teachers from across stages and experience levels, including those in off-class roles such as learning support and casuals. Additionally, for those in a comfort zone, QTR has opened them up to a group that they feel comfortable with to refine practice and then move forward.

11:15 AM
JESS HARRIS
University of Newcastle
QTR Digital: supporting networks of teachers across regional, remote and small schools

Teachers and school leaders in the 46% of Australian schools that are located in rural, regional and remote settings face significant challenges in accessing high quality PD. This presentation focuses on the development and evaluation of QTR Digital, an approach to QTR that connects teachers across school sites. We report on findings from a randomised controlled trial involving 119 teachers from small, regional, and remote schools across NSW to demonstrate the effects of participation in QTR Digital on the quality of teaching, teacher self-efficacy, and student academic achievement in mathematics and reading.

 

Studio 1
9:50 AM
JENNIFER EDWARDS & CHRISTOPHER LINNING
Sydney Secondary College Blackwattle Bay
Quality Teaching – Blackwattle Bay

The team from Sydney Secondary College Blackwattle Bay will share the journey taken and roadmap ahead for QTR in a specialist HSC school. They will explore insights arising from teachers working in cross-curriculum groups and the approach taken by the school for teacher development on the quality of teaching. Central to the presentation will be how the team has overcome challenges, ensured its sustainability, and evaluated its impact. We focus on scoping staff buy in and their connection to pedagogical development programs such as High Leverage Strategies (HLS) and Performance Indicators Visulation and Outreach Tool (PIVOT).

10:20 AM
JAIDE CAELLI & LEIGH MCGOWAN
Kotara Public School
Quality Teaching: a beginning teacher’s perspective

As a beginning teacher at Kotara School SSP, Jaide Caelli has used the QT Model to help inform her pedagogy through reflective practices. She will review her QTR experience and explain how her perceptions changed over the year and contributed to building stronger professional relationships in the workplace. She will touch on the benefits of QTR within a specialised setting and how it has helped her to teach in a more holistic and meaningful way.

11:15 AM
ELENA PRIETO
University of Newcastle
Quality Teaching Rounds in mathematics pre-service teacher education

This presentation will detail a study designed to evaluate the implementation of QTR as an approach to pre-service teacher education in mathematics. The evaluation was conducted through a mixed methods methodology using a combination of surveys containing qualitative and quantitative data, and analysis of student assessment tasks. We found that pre-service teachers found practice-based experience and the subsequent reflections using QTR very valuable compared to other learning experiences at university. We also found that pre-service teachers undertaking a postgraduate degree were significantly more insightful about planning for and reflecting upon their practice than those in the undergraduate program.

 

Studio 2/3
9:50 AM
JENNIFER WICKHAM
James Sheahan Catholic High School
Collaboration for success – the power of reflection

Our school is a professional learning community with a major focus on collaborative and shared practice to continually improve teacher capacity leading to improved student learning. QTR was able to provide us with a structured initiative to implement whole school lesson observations based on the QT Model. The plan is to provide professional development opportunities for teachers to build their capacity to be more reflective about their own teaching practice. This presentation details how we have implemented QTR in our large rural Catholic High School and the initial impact it is having on our learning community.

10:20 AM
NATHAN WOTTON
Sefton High School
Focus on practice rather than person

Two of the toughest parts of leading QTR or Assessment Rounds are firstly gaining substantial teacher buy in and secondly moving the focus away from “teacher pleasing”. This presentation will focus on the important aspects of successfully facilitating QTR that have been learnt over many years of leading professional learning communities. Particular emphasis for this session will be on overcoming coding that is teacher pleasing and how the process of using the QT Model is useful for beginning teachers to understand how to improve pedagogy.

11:15 AM
DREW MILLER
University of Newcastle
Evaluating the impacts of Quality Teaching Rounds in your school

Evaluation of QTR (or any specific initiative) is crucial in establishing feasibility and effectiveness at a school level. It is important to evaluate both the implementation and the effectiveness of an initiative, and a range of outcomes are desirable across multiple levels (students and teachers). The questions of what to measure, how to measure it and how to interpret the results can be overwhelming in a system already full of data. This presentation will outline an evaluation plan for QTR, with discussion of the concepts of measurement across time, using some simple and readily available tools.

1.40pm – 2.05pm School presentations

2.10pm – 2.35pm School presentations

2.40pm – 3.05pm Research presentations

Afternoon tea

3.35pm – 4.25pm Panel session: Improving equity through quality teaching

Moderator: John Bush, Partnerships Manager at the Paul Ramsay Foundation.

Equity is often heralded as a hallmark of a world-class education system, underpinned by both social justice and political motives. In Australia, equity policy is grounded in the belief that education has the power to transform students’ lives and build their capacity to succeed. While promoting equity is one thing, achieving it is another.

In this panel discussion, we will explore how the Quality Teaching Model and Quality Teaching Rounds professional development process can be used to address and disrupt a multitude of inequities in Australian schooling, with a particular focus on socio-economic disadvantage, disability, and our First Nations students.

Panel members:

  • Associate Professor Jess Harris – University of Newcastle
  • Nathan Towney – Pro Vice Chancellor Indigenous Strategy and Leadership University of Newcastle
  • Angus Draffan – Principal Kotara School (SSP)
  • Kelly Jesser – Principal Tullamore Central School
  • Peter Riley – Principal Cessnock High School

Session 2 presentation abstracts

Gallery 1
1:40 PM
LISA LEIBRANDT
Granville Public School
An old dog teaching renewed tricks

Granville Public School is one of the most highly funded schools in the state, due to our unique make-up of more than 40 different cultures, our seven-class support unit and pre-school. As well as mainstream and support unit teachers, we have a range of specialist teachers and middle leaders, and a community hub to support our diverse student body. Yet our outcomes continue to plateau. My new found love of the QT Model has allowed me to analyse data and ask the hard questions of WHY? Getting staff buy in one teacher at a time and creating a culture around quality teaching, raising student outcomes and bringing value back into the profession is now my purpose after 20 years of teaching.

2:10 PM
DREW MILLER, JESS HARRIS, TAMARYN CURRY
University of NewcastlePETER RILEY
Cessnock High School
Partnering for whole school change through Quality Teaching at Cessnock High School

Research into school improvement suggests that significant changes in school performance require a holistic focus on teaching and learning, leadership and cultural change. This presentation outlines a four-year longitudinal partnership with Cessnock High, a school in a community with low socio-educational advantage (ICSEA ~ 870). Implementation outcomes and results are presented for the first year of the partnership, which focused on: 1) the improvement of teaching and learning through engagement with QTR and Assessment Rounds; 2) support for change efforts through the provision of middle-leadership development; and 3) supporting strategic decision making via an information-rich environment. This presentation will be followed by an extended Q&A.

 

Gallery 2
1:40 PM
LEIGH MCGOWAN & ANGUS DRAFFAN
Kotara School
Quality Teaching Rounds in special education

The implementation of QTR at Kotara School SSP, including the Nexus ward at John Hunter Hospital, has transformed school culture, expectations of student achievement and demonstrates the applicability of the QT Model across diverse school settings. In this presentation, we will outline systems and structures that were put in place to guide the implementation of QTR and drive pedagogical reform in a special education setting.

2:10 PM
HARVEY WILSON & VICKIE KRIKOWA
Finigan School of Distance Education
Embedding Quality Teaching Rounds into our online learning environment

As a new distance education K-12 school embarking on delivering live synchronous lessons to our students, our staff undertook a rapid and steep learning curve which included re-skilling in technology and content delivery. QTR provided a supportive, non-judgemental framework through which we could assess our progress while providing opportunities to see how other teachers and students were operating in this space. In two years, we’ve had more than 50% of our staff complete the QTR workshop and undertake at least one set of Rounds.

2:40 PM
JENNY GORE
University of Newcastle
On the value of Quality Teaching Rounds for initial teacher education

While QTR has primarily been made available to practising teachers, it has enormous potential to support beginning teachers, as recognised by the Expert Panel who conducted the Quality Initial Teacher Education Review. The Panel encouraged all ITE providers and schools to take up QTR to ensure evidence-based teaching and powerful induction. In this presentation, I outline exciting findings from a pilot study of QTR with final year students. Laying the foundations for quality teaching by the next generation of teachers is a critical component of a whole-of-workforce initiative to improve teaching and student outcomes.

 

Gallery 3
1:40 PM
BELLA BERYLLIUM
New Lambton Public School
Casually amazing: my Quality Teaching Rounds experience

How can casual teachers put Quality Teaching into practice? This isn’t my class, these aren’t my lessons. The class teacher hasn’t left any instructions. How can I remember all the QT elements and make them work when I’m mostly improvising? I’m one of a handful of casual teachers fortunate enough to have participated in QTR. I’ll be sharing my experience of developing my teaching practice with a small group of amazing casual teachers, and how I apply this knowledge in the chaotic world of casual teaching.

2:10 PM
TRACEY MACKIN & SHANE WOON
Nossal High School
Quality Teaching Rounds as a foundation for cultural continuity

Nossal High School is a relatively young institution which has to date benefited from the existence of a staff culture which has been both engaged and idealistic. Our staff are typically willing to “buy in” to the notion of learning and to the aim of continuous personal growth. As the school has started to come of age, however, slow staff turnover has led to a risk that knowledge about good pedagogy is assumed, and also to a certain “automaticity” in the approach of our skilled teachers who know their students well and who lack the time to reflect deeply on their approach. This presentation outlines the introduction of QTR as a way of ensuring that the existing culture of learning is maintained and enriched by having a portion of the staff regularly engage in deep conversations about their practice every year, and bringing the fruits of those conversations to their teaching teams and domain areas.

2:40 PM
MATT HARPER
University of Newcastle
Quality of Teaching by subject: exploring patterns in mathematics and drama

A vast array of research addressing broad educational aims underscores quality teaching as crucial to the student experience and academic achievement. However, research rarely focuses on teaching across full units of work or explores enduring subject differences. This presentation focuses on classroombased case study research which investigated the nature of teaching and assessment in mathematics and drama – distinct subjects symbolising a host of social and educational issues. My preliminary findings offer fresh perspectives on programming and the quality of teaching and assessment, and raise important questions about how diverse school subjects might differently shape student experience.

 

Studio 1
1:40 PM
NICOLE MOORE & MERRYN O’DEA
Curtin Primary School
Linking Quality Teaching Rounds to whole school improvement

Curtin Primary School has used whole school QTR in various formats since 2011. We will provide historical overview of the varied processes we have implemented then give detail on our work in 2021. During 2021, we implemented QTR as a tool to support whole school improvement in literacy instruction. We will outline the planning, preparatory training and implementation processes as well as share the data we collected. We will then share the expected and surprising findings and impacts on individual teachers and the whole school. We will conclude by sharing our possible next steps.

2:10 PM
NATHAN COLLINS & KELLY RUTHERFORD
Thornton Public School
Quality Teaching Rounds and its impact on Thornton Public School

This presentation explores the impact of QTR on reflective and collaborative practices at Thornton Public School and the Gateway Learning Community, including the positive culture it has created with all staff and the enhanced teaching and learning as a result of their participation.

2:40 PM
ANTHONY RYAN
University of Newcastle
Factors associated with the long term implementation of Quality Teaching Rounds in schools: initial findings

It is well known that translating interventions with evidence of positive outcomes in tightly controlled research studies can be difficult to achieve in real-world settings such as schools. The models, theories and frameworks developed in the field of implementation science were used to study the long term implementation of QTR in schools. A questionnaire developed by the TTRC was combined with other data from the NSW Department of Education to identify factors associated with the long term implementation of QTR and changes in student, teacher and school outcomes. Initial findings will be presented along with preliminary thoughts on the long term implementation of QTR in schools.

 

Studio 2/3
1:40 PM
MITCHELL WELHAM & SARAH HIPWELL
Mannering Park Public School
Improving school culture through professional learning communities (PLCs)

Since 2020, our school has undergone transformational change to develop a whole-school culture of trust and collaboration. The cornerstone to this approach has been the implementation of PLCs for all teachers. Our session will unpack this approach, deep dive into our systems and processes for change, and explore how it is shaping our school towards a more authentic use of the QT Model. We will share our continued journey towards QTR and the tools we have developed along the way which focus on using student data to implement teaching observations across the school.

2:10 PM
LAURA ANDRIKIDIS
Tuggerah Lakes Secondary College – Tumbi Umbi Campus
Quality Teaching Rounds as a catalyst for change

This presentation traces my QTR journey as an experienced Head Teacher Mathematics in a Stage 6 government school. After spending 2021 immersed in the Cessnock High School QTR professional development project as an Instructional Leader, I returned to my role at Tuggerah Lakes Secondary College with a new sense of direction for my teaching. The reflective nature of QTR has holistically transformed my practice. I will be sharing my insights from QTR and the QT Model, as well as how my teaching style has changed and the impact this has had on my students.

2:40 PM
LEANNE FRAY
University of Newcastle
Beyond the need for external facilitation: rethinking a core assumption of effective professional development

An external facilitator is frequently touted as key to effective PD. The need for a facilitator is so taken for granted that it is rarely questioned. Drawing on interviews with 216 teachers and school leaders, we explore the effectiveness of PD that proceeds without the support of an external facilitator. Participants reported that QTR built trust amongst colleagues, provided a shared language and conceptual standards which facilitated conversations about practice. QTR allows for effective and ongoing implementation without the ongoing support of external facilitators.

This event will be a celebration of what the Quality Teaching Academy has achieved in its first 18 months, including training more than 1,500 teachers in Quality Teaching Rounds and welcoming more than 2300 members to its community.

Network with more than 200 teachers and school leaders from around Australia as well as education researchers and other key stakeholders.

Drinks, hot and cold canapes and a live jazz band are all included in your delegate pass.

8am – 8.25am Tea and coffee

8.30am – 8.40am Welcome and reflection on Day 1

8.40am – 9.30am Keynote Helen Watt – Teachers’ Motivation Matters!

9.35am – 10.10am School presentations

10.15am – 10.50am Research presentations

Morning Tea

Session 3 presentation abstracts

Gallery 1
9:35 AM
DREW MILLER
University of Newcastle
REPEAT PRESENTATION
Evaluating the impacts of Quality Teaching Rounds in your schoolEvaluation of QTR (or any specific initiative) is crucial in establishing feasibility and effectiveness at a school level. It is important to evaluate both the implementation and the effectiveness of an initiative, and a range of outcomes are desirable across multiple levels (students and teachers). The questions of what to measure, how to measure it and how to interpret the results can be overwhelming in a system already full of data. This presentation will outline an evaluation plan for QTR, with discussion of the concepts of measurement across time, using some simple and readily available tools.
10:15 AM
ROBYN PRESS
University of Newcastle
Sink or swim? Can beginning teachers stay afloat?

Beginning teachers are faced with navigating the tumultuous waters of adjusting to the demands of curriculum and pedagogy, behaviour management, staff politics, parent relationships and balancing work with other commitments. This presentation examines initial findings of an ongoing research project investigating the professional identity development of beginning teachers and the part that professional development can play in supporting them. What are the consistent themes and factors among early career teachers that keep them ‘afloat’ as they head into the often tumultuous waters of the profession? What part can QTR play in calming the storm? How can we help them to navigate this transition so that novice teachers thrive rather than simply survive, or worse still, sink?

 

Gallery 2
9:35 AM
AMY HARRIMAN & SOPHIA KINTOMINAS
East Hills Girls Technology High School
Driving quality student improvement

To achieve collective efficacy, the QT Model and QTR are most effective when they are at the centre of the actions a school uses to improve teaching and student learning outcomes. A focus on what matters most in the classroom facilitates meaningful collaboration for teachers and improves morale. Fundamental to its success is strategic planning that is focused on embedding QTR into teaching and learning priorities so that teachers have progressively developed their skills through professional learning communities to test teaching practices that are effective in improving literacy and numeracy outcomes for students. QTR is most effective when it is aligned with the school’s strategic directions and has highest impact when it is linked across strategic directions.

10:15 AM
JENNY GORE
University of Newcastle
Quality Teaching Rounds to support teaching out-of-field

This presentation addresses how QTR can strengthen the resilience, confidence, efficacy and the quality of teaching delivered by graduating students, even when teaching out-of-field (TOOF). I outline major challenges for TOOF including the preparation of ITE students, the primacy of curriculum v pedagogical knowledge, developing a shared understanding of quality teaching, and understanding what really matters in the classroom. The QT Model and QTR can provide a strong foundation for quality teaching in any grade or specialisation and build capacity for ongoing refinement of practice, increased efficacy and job satisfaction.

 

Gallery 3
9:35 AM
JACQUELINE BRISKHAM
University of Newcastle
Prioritising Casual Relief Teachers through the provision of professional development

Casual Relief Teachers (CRTs) provide an essential role in the effective functioning of schools, particularly within the current context of teacher shortage. Nonetheless, they occupy a precarious position in the teaching workforce, frequently overlooked and meagrely supported. Limited access to effective professional learning is a persistent challenge faced by CRTs, although PL is recognised as vital for improving classroom skills, increasing standards of teaching, and building stronger teacher identity. This presentation reports on research examining the impacts of participating in Quality Teaching Rounds for 32 CRTs within eight NSW schools. It discusses the feasibility and challenges of conducting quality PL for our most marginalised teachers.

10:15 AM
SALLY PATFIELD
University of Newcastle
Tensions in scaling up effective professional development: case studies of Quality Teaching Rounds implementation across three diverse school communities

Delivering effective professional development at scale necessitates a careful balance between program integrity and local adaptation. More than twenty years ago, Cuban (1998) famously critiqued that “schools change reforms as much as reforms change schools,” drawing attention to the inescapable tension between fidelity and adaptation when a reform is expanded from one school to many. Drawing on qualitative case study data, this presentation explores tensions in the implementation of QTR within three school communities in New South Wales: a single-sex urban secondary school located in a relatively advantaged city suburb; a co-educational K-12 school located in a relatively disadvantaged semi-urban area; and a co-educational secondary school located in an isolated regional township. We examine the ostensive and performative aspects of implementation across each school community and demonstrate how even slight surface-level adaptations to QTR can have profound consequences for teacher learning.

 

Studio 1
9:35 AM
CASEY NORDEN
Illawarra Sports High School
ALLISON LLOYD
Gundagai High School
Don’t let life’s challenges get in the way of a good professional learning community

In a world challenged by staffing changes, COVID and online learning, one professional learning community has overcome obstacles to continue working and thriving in an unexpected format. We will discuss the on-site implementation and maintenance of QTR in a small secondary school and one teacher’s Highly Accomplished accreditation journey. We will explore how QTR has continued through the challenges presented over the past two years and morphed across multiple school settings. We will introduce how we are now going beyond QTR discussions to further improve our teaching.

10:15 AM
BROOKE ROSSER
University of Newcastle
Capitalising on collegiality for better outcomes? Examining the capacity of Quality Teaching Rounds to build social capital for teaching

Social capital has become a popular topic of recent research on teacher performance and development. Some scholars have even called for major policy shifts, despite limited examinations of the capacity of approaches to build teacher social capital. I use social capital theories to examine QTR. Preliminary analyses of survey and interview data document how QTR builds trust, strengthens relationships, enables teachers to realise shared goals, facilitates access to resources, and leads to more frequent, ongoing interactions. I argue QTR positively impacts structural, relational and cognitive aspects of teacher social capital and is an approach worthy of investment.

 

Studio 2/3
9:35 AM
NICHOLE DEMPSEY & LEONIE CLARKSON
Woongarrah Public School
The impact of Quality Teaching Rounds and sustaining it in our school

After reflecting on observation practices and evaluating the results of an external validation process, Woongarrah Public School saw a need for observation procedures that would build collaboration among staff and professional learning that would have a high impact for staff and students. QTR was the answer! Woongarrah Public School was part of the 2019 Building Capacity for Quality Teaching in Australian Schools research project and the impact of Rounds on teachers’ confidence, morale and selfefficacy was powerful enough to ensure QTR was included in future school planning. The who and how were considered by factoring QTR into the school budget and strategic plan.

10:15 AM
WENDY TAGGART
University of Newcastle
Running Australia’s largest randomised controlled trial in education: lessons to strengthen school-based research

In this presentation, I use my experience as the project manager of the largest randomised controlled trial in Australian education research history to expose the messy, unpredictable, challenging, and at times down-right insane rollercoaster of conducting school-based research. Schools do want to engage in meaningful research. It’s important that the research has explicit links to school priorities, has reasonable expectations of participants, provides access to useful data that schools can engage with and, finally, includes a capacity building dimension for teachers or leaders.

11.30am – 12.20pm Panel session: Can professional development really improve teaching and learning?

Moderator: Rob Randall, former CEO of ACARA

In every education system in Australia there is an expectation, often a mandate, for teachers to undertake professional development. But to what extent does professional development really support teachers in the work they do? How do we know? And how can teachers and school leaders make effective judgements on what professional development to pursue?

In this panel session we will use the lens of QT & QTR to explore the field of professional development. Addressing questions of evidence and impact, panellists will discuss how teachers and schools can get the most benefit from the money and time invested in PD.

Panel members:

  • Dr Drew Miller – University of Newcastle
  • Associate Professor Mark Rickinson – Monash University Q Project
  • Judy McEwen – Principal Hambledon Public School NSW
  • Tracey Mackin – Principal Nossal High School VIC

12.20pm – 12.30pm Conference closing remarks

12.30pm – 1.30pm Lunch